Saturday, June 14, 2014

PPG - Managing the Primary ESL Classroom (TSL3093) - Topic 1



























































27 comments :

  1. The information on the slides is obtained from the PPG Module of TSL3093-Managing the Primary ESL Classroom, solely for the use of PPG students of Sem 5, Ambilan Khas Feb 2013)

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  2. Dear teachers,
    Write your answer for the above task here.

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  3. Howard Miller, Associate Professor of Education at Lincoln University (Jefferson City, Missouri) suggests 12 steps teachers can take at the beginning of the year to promote effective classroom management.

    1.Develop a set of written expectations you can live with and enforce.
    2.Be consistent. Be consistent. Be consistent.
    3.Be patient with yourself and with your students.
    4.Make parents your allies. Call early and often. Use the word "concerned." When communicating a concern, be specific and descriptive.
    5.Don't talk too much. Use the first 15 minutes of class for lectures or presentations, then get the kids working.
    6.Break the class period into two or three different activities. Be sure each activity segues smoothly into the next.
    7.Begin at the very beginning of each class period and end at the very end.
    8.Don't roll call. Take the roll with your seating chart while students are working.
    9.Keep all students actively involved. For example, while a student does a presentation, involve the other students in evaluating it.
    10.Discipline individual students quietly and privately. Never engage in a disciplinary conversation across the room.
    11.Keep your sense of perspective and your sense of humor.
    12.Know when to ask for help.

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    1. I agree with the suggestions given by Howard Miller Cikgu Fadhli...and as a teachers we all always concern about our students and be patient eventhough they are creating a lot dicipline problems in the classrooom. So sure we will achieve our goal to optimise the pupil's time for learning with promoting an effective classroom management in future.

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  4. Time management in the classroom is a process
    Effective time management in the classroom is one of the keys to engaging students in successful learning and teachers need to plan it carefully. However, it is a process not simply a series of events and you should use your instinct and personal knowledge of your students to allow your plan to evolve. The aim is to engage students, and you will probably need to train your classes in how to use their time effectively in class.

     explain to the students exactly what the intended learning intentions of the lesson are;
     display these for students to see at the start, with approximate timings, and refer to these outcomes at intervals throughout the lesson;
     explain clearly but briskly any instructions students need to be able to complete the activity - as your class becomes more familiar with different activities explanations will take up much less time, and this will add to the pace you want to achieve - it helps if students can both see and hear the instructions you give;
     tell students you won't take any questions at this stage [assuming that you've explained everything carefully] because you want to get the activity under way - say there'll be a chance for review of the activity later when you'll take questions from students;
     make it clear exactly what type of activity it is: eg teacher presentation during which students are silent, discussion in groups or with partners , individual silent work, practical task and so on - make sure students know exactly how much time they have to do the activity
     use countdown reminders eg 'You have 3 minutes left', 'You now have 1 minute left' - make sure students can see the clock in your classroom;
     encourage students that you want to see / hear what they've done in the time limit, even if the task is not fully completed; this often provides a discussion point for talking later in the lesson about learning strategies - and it is a good idea to get your students used to 'sharing the information' around the class, so everyone benefits from everyone's contributions
     sometimes making the activity competitive helps to keep the pace brisk - this is especially true with boys - but we need to be careful that the activity does not simply became a race to see who can finish first;
     consider livening things up with a bit of music - some research suggests that music with 60 to 70 beats to the minute enhances learning activities - some movie themes might work well with some classes: a word of caution - be careful with music, sometimes the auditory learners in your class may start to pay more attention to the music, especially if it's music with lyrics, than to the learning task;
     it's better to finish an activity early, even if not complete, and allow some time for review or a plenary session before the lesson ends;

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  5. As a teacher nowadays, facing all kind of problems will create more frustrations while teaching. The frustration will not only will be faced by parties, the teacher and the pupils. Therefore, the teachers must always improve the classroom management used by them so that they can optimize the pupil’s time in teaching and learning process. There are ways that can be used by teachers for classroom management.

    1. A teacher must be a leader in the classroom. Make sure that the pupils respected the teacher as the leader as we all know that a leader will set as example by the pupils. A teacher will also be the mirror of his pupil’s attitude.

    2. Demonstrate acceptable behaviour. A teacher must treat the students with the same respect that the teacher demands.

    3. A teacher must be able to switch any activity used in the classroom if they detected that the pupils are starting to get out of control.

    4. Used games to demonstrate the need for rules. It means that the teacher must set in the pupils mind that there are rules in everything they do so that the process will goes on smoothly.

    5. A teacher must always be alert of the objectives and learning outcomes so that the teaching and learning process will comes out as expected.

    6. A teacher must also listen to their pupils if they want to express certain feelings towards the lesson.

    7. Motivate the pupils. Build a relationship with the pupils and always motivate them to do their best.

    8. A teacher must always be calm, fair and consistent in approaching the pupils so that the pupils will not feel discriminated and unwanted and this will make them more focus in the lesson.

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    1. Hi Nizam I agreed with your statements. Here i would like to share some Simple Effective Classroom Management Tips:

      Often the simplest classroom management tips are also the most logical and they can also be the most effective when trying to create an efficient environment for teaching. Here are some really simple tips and techniques you can apply in your classroom to foster the best environment for learning and teaching:

      1. Lead your class
      2. Be consistent
      3. Demonstrate acceptable behavior
      4. Motivate your students
      5. Reward good behavior

      Lead Your Class

      Effective leadership requires a number of skills, irrespective of whether its leadership in business or leadership in a classroom setting. A leader always knows where they are going. Leaders ensure that they have a plan that will get them to where they are going. A good teacher should display the qualities of a good leader to ensure that the class knows where they are going and how they can get there. As a teacher you must be able to communicate the plan efficiently. If you effectively convey your class goals and ambitions to your students, then you can often create the motivation they need to succeed.

      Be Consistent

      As a teacher, you expect consistent effort from your students and you expect them to consistently focus on your lessons. The best way for students to learn behavior is through the observation of that behavior. As a teacher, you need to ensure that you model consistent behavior for your students. Engage the students in setting rules and standards and then make sure that you apply those standards and rules consistently as a teacher.

      Demonstrate Acceptable Behavior

      Respect is earned. As a teacher, you need to demonstrate the behavior you wish to see from your students. If you expect your students to respect you, then you should make every effort to respect your students. If you expect a student to listen to you, then you should be willing to listen to your students with a view to really understanding their needs and problems.

      Motivate Your Students

      A motivated class is far easier to management than a class that is bored or lost. Finding out what motivates your class can help you to create rewards for your class that will keep them motivated and interested in your subject. Motivation will vary depending on the subject matter of the class and the level of the class, but observing your students is a great way to work out what motivates them. If you take the time to notice what makes your student’s eyes sparkle while you are teaching, then you will have direct feedback from your students about what they love to learn.

      Reward Good Behavior

      Sometimes as teachers we get bogged down in discipline and miss opportunities to reward good behavior. Rewarding good behavior can often have as much impact on a class as meting out discipline for bad behavior. Rewards can often act as motivation to strive for better results as a student. Once again, observing your students and listening to their particular needs will give you a constant stream of information on what will make good rewards for your classes.

      Ganesan Veerappan
      PPG Tesl
      Sem 5

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    2. Assalammualaikum Nizam. I strongly agreed with your statements regarding the teachers’ role to improve the classroom management optimizing pupils’ time. Besides the ways that you shared above, a teacher should always make a reflection on her or his lesson. Certainly when we plan, we who teach are thinking about what we hope to achieve. But we need to go beyond that. We need to think about why we teach. As I learned in my teacher training, "because it is in the curriculum" is an insufficient answer, and as a teacher of social studies, this reasoning will not enable me to connect the material with my pupils in a class merely because it is a requirement for graduation.
      It is often hard with all the other responsibilities teachers have to reflect upon how a lesson or exercise or test went compared to what one expected, but it is critical. If something has not gone as expected, I want to ponder why, so that I do not make the same mistake again. Sometimes I cannot wait until the end of the school day—if there is a problem, something misleading or counterproductive, do not I owe it to the pupils yet to be in my room for that prep to address it before they come in? This is why I find no matter how involved I may be in a lesson, I have to keep a part of myself outside, observing, reflecting even as I go.
      One possible outcome of a reflection is the recognition that I may have done harm. Or that I have allowed my own sense of injury to shut me off from recognizing what I need to do. Then I remember a line from the Sufi mystic Rumi: "The wound is the place where the Light enters you." Reflection helps me use my own weakness, and also enables me at times to see how to reach my pupils through their weaknesses.

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  6. Losing control of the classroom can be one of the most frustrating and intimidating experiences for both new and experienced teachers. Losing control can happen in several different ways. The most common would be where the class is distracted. This could be from a situation outside the classroom such as noisy conversation in the hall, or from an event elsewhere that students find out about, such as a rumor of the football coach getting fired. Losing control can also happen within the classroom, such as when one student monopolizes the discussion, or where there is a general lack of interest in the lecture, and many students are obviously not paying attention. Here are nine possible ways to regain students’ attention.
    1. Have a distinct sounding object, such as a bell or cymbal. As long as you don’t use it too often, this can be an effective way to bring student’s attention back to the lecture or class discussion.
    2. Signal nonverbally, and make eye contact with students when they hold side conversations, start to fall asleep, or show contempt for the lecture material. You can also use hand signals to encourage a wordy student to finish what he or she is saying, or make a time out “T” sign with your fingers to stop unwanted behavior.
    3. Remember what your parents told you when a sibling was bothering you. Sometimes it is best to ignore mildly negative behaviors. Often the behavior will disappear if you do not pay any attention to it.
    4. Discuss very negative behaviors in private. During break or after class firmly request a change in behavior of those students who are disruptive. At our university it is very easy for professors to drop disruptive students from class, so one warning is usually enough.
    5. Use humor. One of my favorite techniques is to stop the lecture, put on a mysterious expression, and look directly at the disruptive student. I announce to the class that I am getting a vision of that student sitting in the same chair next semester repeating the class over again. Usually the whole class laughs, but it gets the message across to everyone that this particular behavior has consequences.
    6. Rein in overparticipators. If somebody monopolizes a discussion, I acknowledge the value of their viewpoints and invite them to discuss their views with me during a break. An alternative is to ask for other class members for their perspectives on the topic.
    7. Implement participation rules. Tell the class that you would like to use rules such as the following: Only students who have not yet spoken can add to the discussion moving forward. Each new comment must build on a previous idea, etc.
    8. Mix it up. If the last idea does not work very well, change the method of participation. Sometimes, you can experiment with new formats, such as using pairs or small groups rather than whole-class activities.
    9. Don’t take it personally. Many problem behaviors have nothing to do with you. They often represent the personal frustrations and insecurities of the student. Make a point of getting to know the disruptive student during breaks or after class. It is less likely that students will continue to give you a hard time or remain distant if you have taken an interest in them.
    By experimenting with one or more of these classroom management techniques, you will probably find that losing control of a class happens much less frequently and you will feel more confident in your ability to quickly regain students’ attention when it does.

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    1. hi bro... let me share some tips.. and I think these are for all teachers out there too...
      Be Punctual
      A teacher who arrives late for a class not only sets the children a bad example but also may have to quell a riot before the lesson can begin. Punctuality at the end of the lesson is of equal importance. Children soon resent being constantly late out for break or last in the lunch queue or late for the next lesson
      Avoid Anger
      Teachers who lose their temper may say and do things in the heat of the moment that they come to regret later. Certainly all teachers on accasions will feel the need to speak sharply to children, but this quite different from heated outbursts in the schools or for the state of his or her physical health
      Offer Opportunities for responsibility
      If all responsibility rests with the teacher, then it is not surprising that children behave irresponsibly when not under difrect supervision. Offering children responsibility not only shows them they have the teacher's confidence, it also leads them to realize that what happens in the class is their concern just as much as it is the teacher's.
      Focus Attention
      General appeals for quiet or order in a classroom are of much less value than calling out the name of the child or children most directly involved, and thus focusing the attention of the class.In the silence that follows, the teacher can then issue further instructions.
      Be Alert
      An important characteristic of teachers with good class control is that they appear to know at all times exactly what is going on in the classroom. They move frequently around the room . and insist children wait in their places when they have difficulties with their work rather than besieging the teacher who became isolated from the main action by a detachment of hand-waving children.
      Use Positive Language
      The emphasis should always be upon what we want children to do rather than upon what they refrain from doing. Thus we say " come in quietly " rather than " don't make so much noise ", " look at your books " rather than " stop turning around "
      Be Confident
      Teachers who go into the class with a hesitant, tentative manner suggest to children that they are expecting trouble and are probably accustomed to being disobeyed. Very well, the class think to themselves, the teacher will not be disappointed. If, on the other hand, teachers are able to give the impression they are used to getting on well with children, then once again the children will be included to take this at face value and offer co-operation. So even if the teacher is feeling inexperienced and apprehensive, the moral is not to show it.
      Be Well-organized
      Good classroom organization means :
      A- making clear to children exactly what is expected of them in the way of getting out or putting away apparatus and equipment before they start to do it
      B- Children know where things are kept and they each have clear duties and responsibilities, both to deal with the normal running of the classroom and with the sudden emergencies when things get split or broken.
      C- Planning lessons carefully so that the practical activities are within the scope and the competence of both teacher and class and never threaten to get out of hand.
      D- A well-organized lesson with adequate material carefully prepared and with all equipment to hand and in goood working order is way better than one that even the teacher concedes bears a certain resemblance to a shambles.

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    2. Hi Ganesan

      A teacher is a self made motivator. Pupils rely on us to keep them in the mood and motivated during lesson. Here are some tips on how to keep your pupils motivated.

      1. Children fulfill the expectations that the adults around them communicate. This does not mean that every student will score 100% on every test we write. It does mean that if you communicate to a child that he or she is failure, he or she will fail. If you communicate to that same child that he or she will succeed; you will often find that that is the outcome. With every opportunity, encourage your students that they are making progress in their language learning. Point out to them the areas in which you see progress and improvement. For areas in which a student struggles, try to portray a picture of what success will look like. Encouraging your students to visualize their success will aid them in accomplishing those goals you set before them.

      2. Making sure you are teaching to all the learning styles in your classrooms is another way to motivate your students. It is unrealistic to expect an auditory learner to be successful and motivated if her sole instruction comes from reading a textbook. Likewise, a kinesthetic learner will be frustrated listening to his teacher lecture class after class. Make sure, as you plan your lessons that you are teaching to all the learning styles in your classroom. If you do, you will engage students who might otherwise struggle to pay attention in class.

      3. When a student disengages from class, it is a good opportunity for you the teacher to notice what methods you are using in class. Although some practices may be fine for most students, timed tests, independent learning time, self-checking methods, for example, there will be students who not only do not connect with these methods but who suffer negatively when you use them in your classroom. If a student begins to disengage, be aware of the methods you are using and look for patterns. Though it is difficult to meet every need of a classroom full of language learners, you can take pains to avoid certain methods when it is possible to help certain students perform better in class. This will also help you be intentional about using a variety of methods with your class further engaging all of them.

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  7. Teachers can use time management in the classroom to optimize the learning opportunities. When we think of the concept 'time' with regard to learning we often think of pace, in other words, moving quickly through the planned learning activities. At least that’s what I think off. But it's easy to think that pace means having to rush through an activity, which sometimes can be a mistake. Pace needs to be appropriate: the learning needs to proceed briskly, but not in rushed. When considering effective time management in the classroom as a means of making learning most effective for my pupils, progression needs to be planned for as well as pace. Progression means that my pupils are able to move through specific activities making cognitive progress as they go. It could mean that they will know more, understand concepts better, can use what they know in different contexts, or move from lower order thinking to higher order thinking. It's very easy for teachers to think in terms of what they must do during the lesson, but it's smarter classroom time management to plan what the pupils must do.
    I have found these ideas helpful when planning pace and progression.
    explain to the pupils exactly what the intended learning intentions of the lesson are;
    explain clearly but briskly any instructions pupils need to be able to complete the activity - as your class becomes more familiar with different activities explanations will take up much less time, and this will add to the pace you want to achieve - it helps if pupils can both see and hear the instructions you give;
    make it clear exactly what type of activity it is: eg teacher presentation during which pupils are silent, discussion in groups or with partners , individual silent work, practical task and so on - make sure pupils know exactly how much time they have to do the activity;
    use countdown reminders eg 'You have 3 minutes left', 'You now have 1 minute left.
    sometimes making the activity competitive helps to keep the pace brisk - this is especially true with boys - but we need to be careful that the activity does not simply became a race to see who can finish first;
    In my opinion the more engaged time pupils have, the higher they achieve. These are a few steps I’ve used in order to achieve the objectives of my lessons.
    Step 1: Explanation. Pupils require explanation for most curricular aims or learning goals. For example, if a teacher wants pupils to be able to perform oral presentations and assess their own skills, then they need to be able use an evaluation rubric containing four criteria. The teacher would explain—perhaps in lecture format—the meaning of the rubric’s four factors and how to apply those factors to assess a presentation.
    Step 2: Modeling. It's often helpful for pupils to see "what it would look like" to actually have mastered the learning goal
    Step 3: Guided practice. Demanding learning goals require assistance and practice. Teachers need to include a number of instructional activities for pupilss to practice with improvement-oriented guidance and feedback.
    Step 4: Independent practice. At this point the pupils are to display genuine mastery of the learning goal. Engaged time-on-task is especially relevant here.

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    1. Azlima here I would like to share my experience and give you some tips about effective classrom management with you.

      Getting students to pay attention, let alone actually learn something, is a challenge. It takes grit, determination, creativity, and a close eye. Teachers, in-classroom parents, assistants, and administrators need to be as up to speed as possible in order to be effective. When it comes to effective classroom management, there are a couple dozen things you should know.

      Personally, I like the ‘signal’ idea where you have a predetermined sign or signal that shows the students are either off task or simply not paying attention. By using such a signal, you’re raising awareness that not only do you (the teacher, in this case) notice that the room is off task, the rest of the class notices it too. It’s a great way to keep students from straying too much off topic (although sometimes that can be a good thing in project-based learning or flipped classrooms).

      As a teacher, I will:
      • Show respect for each child and for his or her family.
      • Make efficient use of learning time.
      • Provide a safe and comfortable environment that's conducive to learning.
      • Help each child grow to his or her fullest potential.
      • Provide meaningful and appropriate homework activities.
      • Provide necessary assistance to parents so they can help with assignments.
      • Enforce school and classroom rules fairly and consistently.
      • Supply students and parents with clear evaluations of progress and achievement.
      • Use special activities in the classroom to make learning enjoyable.
      • Demonstrate professional behavior and a positive attitude.

      Ganesan Veerappan
      PPG Tesl
      Sem 5

      Delete
  8. Simple Effective Classroom Management Tips
    Often the simplest classroom management tips are also the most logical and they can also be the most effective when trying to create an efficient environment for teaching. Here are some really simple tips and techniques you can apply in your classroom to foster the best environment for learning and teaching:
    1. Lead your class
    2. Be consistent
    3. Demonstrate acceptable behavior
    4. Motivate your students
    5. Reward good behavior
    Lead Your Class
    Effective leadership requires a number of skills, irrespective of whether its leadership in business or leadership in a classroom setting. A leader always knows where they are going. Leaders ensure that they have a plan that will get them to where they are going. A good teacher should display the qualities of a good leader to ensure that the class knows where they are going and how they can get there. As a teacher you must be able to communicate the plan efficiently. If you effectively convey your class goals and ambitions to your students, then you can often create the motivation they need to succeed.
    Be Consistent
    As a teacher, you expect consistent effort from your students and you expect them to consistently focus on your lessons. The best way for students to learn behavior is through the observation of that behavior. As a teacher, you need to ensure that you model consistent behavior for your students. Engage the students in setting rules and standards and then make sure that you apply those standards and rules consistently as a teacher.
    Demonstrate Acceptable Behavior
    Respect is earned. As a teacher, you need to demonstrate the behavior you wish to see from your students. If you expect your students to respect you, then you should make every effort to respect your students. If you expect a student to listen to you, then you should be willing to listen to your students with a view to really understanding their needs and problems.
    Motivate Your Students
    A motivated class is far easier to management than a class that is bored or lost. Finding out what motivates your class can help you to create rewards for your class that will keep them motivated and interested in your subject. Motivation will vary depending on the subject matter of the class and the level of the class, but observing your students is a great way to work out what motivates them. If you take the time to notice what makes your student’s eyes sparkle while you are teaching, then you will have direct feedback from your students about what they love to learn.
    Reward Good Behavior
    Sometimes as teachers we get bogged down in discipline and miss opportunities to reward good behavior. Rewarding good behavior can often have as much impact on a class as meting out discipline for bad behavior. Rewards can often act as motivation to strive for better results as a student. Once again, observing your students and listening to their particular needs will give you a constant stream of information on what will make good rewards for your classes.


    -perlyn-

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    1. Perlyn,
      I would like to say yes to your methods that you have been used in your teaching lesson. The five criteria you have mention are the most suitable ways to overcame the pupils attraction in the classroom. Other than that you also can try use the how-not ways in your classroom. As a teacher you can call the pupils that have discipline problems and you can ask them to answer question, to act, or else in front of the classroom. So that the pupils will know that if they misbehave in your lesson, they will have to do something in front of their friends all alone. Some of the misbehave pupils usually are not brave enough to stand in front of audience.
      Either than giving rewards, pupils nowadays are rich enough than the teacher. Sometimes they even unappreciated our feelings when we give simple rewards to them. This in on my personal experience when I was teaching the pupils from rich family. But differently with the pupils that come from rural area. They really appreciate their teacher.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. i could have agree more with you perlyn. especially the 5 btips you've given. In my mind, the first and most basic obligation of a teacher is to see the beauty that exists within every student. Every child is infinitely precious.

      When we start from this vantage point, classroom management -- and its flip side, student engagement -- comes more easily. It's an outgrowth of students feeling loved and respected.

      Delete
    4. In my mind, the first and most basic obligation of a teacher is to see the beauty that exists within every student. Every child is infinitely precious.

      When we start from this vantage point, classroom management -- and its flip side, student engagement -- comes more easily. It's an outgrowth of students feeling loved and respected.
      ALL IN ALL, i agree with you. here's my tips for you to share:
      1. Love your Students
      2. Assume the Best in Your Students
      3. Praise What and When You Can
      4. Do Sweat the Small Stuff
      5. Identify Yourself
      6. Forge a Class Identity
      7. Have a Plan

      Delete
  9. As teachers become more and more accountable for student success, taking advantage of every minute of class time becomes crucial. Efficient use of class time can increase student performance and decrease teacher anxiety.
    1. Lead-In Activity-
    • technique used to get students on-task immediately upon entering the classroom, while the teacher takes role and organizes class materials.
    • “Quote/Word of the Day“ - Students respond to a quote or word written on the board by putting in down in their notebooks.
    • Trivia Question or Brain Teaser- Students are given a question that will challenge them and get their brains “warmed up.”
    • On-demand Prompt- Students respond to a on-demand writing prompt to be put in their notebooks. Many schools encourage on-demand writing because of the Senior CATS Testing section.
    • Shortly discuss the lead-in activity before beginning class.

    2. Preview-
    • make sure students know what is expected of them during your class time.
    • Discuss each portion of the class in advance so that students know what is in store for them.
    • Have a student recap the previous day’s lesson by giving a short overview in front of the class (this also promotes communication skills.)

    3. Lecture/Notes-
    • Students attention spans are short, but notes and lecture a very necessary.
    • Cover a suitable amount of material so that the main points can be reinforced later in the class through activities.
    • Encourage student input and questioning during lecture time.
    • Demonstration/ Group Activity (15-20 minutes)- provide a hands-on activity to reinforce the class topic.
    • Examples of this could be a group assignment, a lab experiment, a brainstorming activity, a demonstration, etc

    4. Lesson Overview-
    • make sure that all the main points of the lesson have been addressed during this time.
    • Review topics by asking students “What did we learn today?” See if they got the message.
    • Have students reflect in their notebooks what they thought were the important topics of the day’s lesson.


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  10. Simple Effective Classroom Management
    I had use a number of effective classroom management strategies available, no excuse will suffice. The fact is, it doesn’t matter who is on your roster, who their parents are, or what neighbourhood they live in. As a teacher I have the power to transform my classroom into the one I really want. It is not always easy to perform it. There is a learning curve. But the information is out there and available, just waiting. All I need to do is put it into practice. To get started, here is a list of five simple classroom management strategies I always do in my classroom. They’re sure to make my life easier and my teaching more effective.
    1. Slow Down. Excitability is a major cause of misbehaviour. And here’s the thing: teachers create most of it by rushing around, talking a mile a minute, and blazing through their lessons. The solution is to simply take a deep breath and slow down.
    Taking your time has a calming effect on students. It also results in better learning, improved attentiveness, and fewer behaviour problems.
    2. Pause Often. Most teachers talk over their students. In other words, they begin—or continue—speaking without having everyone’s attention. This encourages students to tune you, start their own conversations, or do something they shouldn’t.
    The solution is to pause frequently during instruction. This rhythm of speech is a subtle accountability measure that causes students to attend and focus on you and your lesson, rather than distractions around them.
    3. Take A Break. I don’t care how dynamic I am, if my students sit too long, they’re going to grow restless and become less attentive and more apt to misbehave. It’s only natural.
    To keep them from climbing the walls, be proactive and give them an occasional break. Get them up out of their seats for some exercise, light stretching, or a chance to say hello to their classmates. It will do them, and you, a lot of good.
    4. One-Minute Of Silence. If at any time I feel my class control slipping away, I will stop my students and ask for one-minute of silence. This 60-second strategy has a way of rebooting an unruly classroom, allowing you to start fresh on the other side. It’s also a great way to begin transitions, calm down from an exciting lesson, or end the school day.
    5. The How-Not Strategy. The how-not strategy is a powerful method for curbing misbehaviour pupils. The way it works is simple: you model for your students how not to behave. For example, if my pupils call out in class or otherwise disrupt learning, then shine a spotlight on those particular behaviours by modeling them in a highly detailed way.
    This illuminates for my pupils the absurdity of misbehaving, allowing them to see their actions in a new light. Few strategies are as effective. Effective classroom management doesn’t have to be complicated. In fact, if the strategies you’re relying on aren’t simple, then chances are they’re not going to work.
    Other teachers should try these five strategies above. I think you’ll be happy with the results. They’re as easy can be, they’ll improve behaviour almost instantly, and they’ll bring a level of peace to your classroom you may never have experienced.

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    1. Herda,
      I would like to say your methods that you have been used in your teaching lesson are good. The criteria you have mention are the most suitable ways to overcame the pupils attraction in the classroom. One-Minute of Silence. If at any time I feel my class control slipping away, I will stop my students and ask for one-minute of silence. This 60-second strategy has a way of rebooting an unruly classroom, allowing you to start fresh on the other side. It’s also a great way to begin transitions, calm down from an exciting lesson, or end the school day. I will practice it in my classroom. I remember also in your presentation that you bring a puppet of sign big silent mouth. I practice it in my Year 1 class and able to attract pupils and their stunned. They keep silent when I show the sign of big mouth.
      Maria bt Zainal
      PPG TESL Ambilan Khas

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  11. Classroom management. It’s effective discipline.It’s being prepared for class.It’s motivating your students.It’s providing a safe, comfortable learning environment.It’s building your students’ self esteem.It’s being creative and imaginative in daily lessons.
    Important of classroom management. Satisfaction and enjoyment in teaching are dependent upon leading students to cooperate.
    Benefit of classroom management that optimize the pupils time or learning. During the activities of reading, silence can be effective. Pupils will concentrate and understand what does she or he reading. Same also with listening and speaking activities. Use softer voice so students really have to listen to what you’re saying. Direct your instruction so that students know what is going to happen in activities of language art. So,they can understand the instruction clearly.
    Maria bt Zainal
    PPG TESL Ambilan Khas

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  12. Effective teachers use an array of instructional strategies because there is no single, universal approach that suits all situations. Different strategies used in different combinations with different groupings of students will improve learning outcomes. Some strategies are better suited to teaching certain skills and fields of knowledge than others. Additionally, some strategies are better suited to certain student backgrounds, learning styles and abilities. The key to effective teaching and learning is the teacher's ability to select and weave these strategies to meet the specific learning needs of each student.
    It should be noted that many of the critical features of teaching and learning strategies identified from the research on literacy and numeracy have been found to be effective in a range of learning areas. Many are features of effective teaching and learning and are not specific to teaching literacy and numeracy knowledge, skills and understandings.

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  13. Classroom management in the ESL / EFL classroom can be challenging at times because of a number of variables in English classroom management. However, one key element of classroom management remains the same: The desire to communicate in English. This article discusses the challenges of classroom management that occur in one form or another in most ESL / EFL settings. Also provided are a number of suggestions to deal with these issues. There is also an opportunity for teachers to learn from each other by contributing your own experiences in classroom management, as well as tips for effective classroom management.

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  14. Classrooms managed based on fear create disaffection and disengagement from the learning tasks, which are often "blamed" on students as the reason so much rigid order is needed. So learning suffers, genuine learning, even if there is a lot of rote seatwork being done.

    Learning is work of the head and work of the heart. A climate of fear thwarts all of the goals of higher learning. Plus, as David Brooks so insightfully points out, children often learn first for the teacher, to please the teacher and to obtain the teacher's pleasure in their learning, more than they learn for the intrinsic value they attach to the subject matter or tasks. This is especially true when pupils are introduced to new content and concepts.

    Those concerned about classroom management must simultaneously be concerned about student learning. Both thrive only when there are trusting, respectful, caring relationships between pupils and teachers. When the latter are in place, rules will be effective and the majority of pupils will be engaged learners.

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  15. Classrooms managed based on fear create disaffection and disengagement from the learning tasks, which are often "blamed" on students as the reason so much rigid order is needed. So learning suffers, genuine learning, even if there is a lot of rote seatwork being done.

    Learning is work of the head and work of the heart. A climate of fear thwarts all of the goals of higher learning. Plus, as David Brooks so insightfully points out, children often learn first for the teacher, to please the teacher and to obtain the teacher's pleasure in their learning, more than they learn for the intrinsic value they attach to the subject matter or tasks. This is especially true when students are introduced to new content and concepts.

    Those concerned about classroom management must simultaneously be concerned about student learning. Both thrive only when there are trusting, respectful, caring relationships between students and teachers. When the latter are in place, rules will be effective and the majority of students will be engaged learners.

    ReplyDelete
  16. An effective classroom management is observed when a teacher is able to grasp the attention of the students.
    1. This is made possible with the teachers own voice projection. Speaking loudly and clearly with definitely grab the focus of the students towards the teachers.

    2. The lesson must be well prepared. So that the students are actively involved in the lesson. The set induction of the lesson is very crucial to grab the focus of the students.


    3. The methodology used by the teacher is also important. Innovative and creative methods with variation will attract the students to the lesson. The activities must be challenging for students to solve.

    4. Developing students thinking skills through thinking maps will help to develop students’ disposition.


    Ganesan Veerappan
    PPG TESL
    Sem 5

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